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Chiloglottis trapeziformis

Diamond ant orchid at Black Mountain

Chiloglottis trapeziformis at Black Mountain - 28 Sep 2015
Chiloglottis trapeziformis at Black Mountain - 28 Sep 2015
Chiloglottis trapeziformis at Black Mountain - 28 Sep 2015
Chiloglottis trapeziformis at Black Mountain - 28 Sep 2015
Chiloglottis trapeziformis at Black Mountain - 28 Sep 2015
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Identification history

Chiloglottis trapeziformis 28 Sep 2015 TonyWood
Chiloglottis trapeziformis 28 Sep 2015 AaronClausen

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Significant sighting

29 Sep 2015

Rarely recorded orchid only known from a few locations in the ACT

9 comments

   29 Sep 2015
Tony and Tobias what do you think these are???
MattM wrote:
   29 Sep 2015
Are these on the south side? There are thousands of Chiloglottis on the south side.
   29 Sep 2015
Yeah kind of South facing, but part of bush fire regime surveying.
MattM wrote:
   30 Sep 2015
Rare? How so? I thought it was a common orchid on Black Mountain's south facing slopes. I've even found some growing in a drain!
TonyWood wrote:
   30 Sep 2015
I would not call them rare, and plenty to be found in sheltered gullies on BM, but not much elsewhere to date in the ACT.
   30 Sep 2015
This is a good discussion guys, also what about C. trilabra numbers on Black Mountain versus C. trapeziformis?? I have seen thousands of Chiloglottis leaves on BM (yes in the gullies etc), but had assumed they were C. trilabra? Or is it the other way around?
MattM wrote:
   30 Sep 2015
I'm not sure. It might even be a mix. It's certainly hard to tell when "only a small proportion of plants in a colony produce flowers". I happened to visit one of my bush fire sites today, and half of it had Chiloglottis leaves, including flowering trapeziformis.
   30 Sep 2015
Ok interesting Matt. Well I think we have plenty of more mapping to do then to paint a better picture of their distribution...!
TonyWood wrote:
   30 Sep 2015
Neither are especially common. But both are colony forming and when they appear it can be in large numbers. As colonies they tend to have a relatively small proportion of flowering plants. Their flowering times of course are quite different.

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Location information

Species information

  • Sensitive
  • Local Native
  • Non-Invasive

Sighting information

  • 16 - 100 Abundance
  • 28 Sep 2015 11:30 AM Recorded on
  • AaronClausen Recorded by

Additional information

  • True In flower

Record quality

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  • More than one media file
  • Confirmed by an expert moderator
  • Nearby sighting(s) of same species
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