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Other mothHeterocera species (a grouping of families)

Moth species at Unknown

5 images

Heterocera species (a grouping of families) at Unknown - 23 Jan 2019
Heterocera species (a grouping of families) at Unknown - 23 Jan 2019
Heterocera species (a grouping of families) at Unknown - 23 Jan 2019
Heterocera species (a grouping of families) at Unknown - 23 Jan 2019
Heterocera species (a grouping of families) at Unknown - 23 Jan 2019

Identification history

Other moth Heterocera species (a grouping of families) 18 Aug 2019 MichaelMulvaney
Other moth Heterocera species (a grouping of families) 18 Aug 2019 donhe
Other moth Tortricinae sp. (subfamily) 17 Aug 2019 MichaelMulvaney
Unidentified 26 Jan 2019 Alison Milton

Author's notes

This caterpillar curled itself into a leaf. A 'finished' cocoon was on the next branch (photo 5).

13 comments

RogerF wrote:
   26 Jan 2019
Can you keep the cocoon to see what emerges please
   26 Jan 2019
Okay, I'll go back up and collect one of them.
KimPullen wrote:
   26 Jan 2019
Alison, I think this is a moth rather than a beetle. What is the host plant?
   26 Jan 2019
The host plant was a young Eucalypt. I was thinking about the many Eucalypt beetles I've been finding. I'll collect a cocoon and see what hatches.
RogerF wrote:
   26 Jan 2019
most eucalypt beetles pupate in the ground
donhe wrote:
   17 Aug 2019
Many species in Oecophoridae and Crambidae, as well as Tortricidae, have caterpillars that live in rolled-leaf shelters. I can see little hope of even determining the family without getting a moth from it.
donhe wrote:
   17 Aug 2019
Roger: are there Coleoptera larvae that roll leaves to form a shelter like this?
   17 Aug 2019
Thanks. I didn't manage to get back for quite a while and when I did I couldn't find any rolled leaves. Maybe next season?
RogerF wrote:
   17 Aug 2019
There are leaf rolling weevils in the family Attelabidae such as Euops spp. The most notable example being the giraffe weevil from Madagascar.
donhe wrote:
   18 Aug 2019
I thought it was the adults of Euops and Trachelophorus weevils that rolled the leaves, not the larvae?
Alison's photos I think show the unknown larva rolling the leaf.
RogerF wrote:
   18 Aug 2019
The female weevil rolls the leaf and lays an egg inside where the larva develops, as shown in Alision's photo. The image does not look like a weevil larva but is more likely a moth larva.
   18 Aug 2019
In this case the larva actually curled the leaf as I watched. It didn't hatch in the leaf.
donhe wrote:
   18 Aug 2019
The caterpillars of all the Australian butterfly species are well known, and this is not one of them, so it appears to be an undetermined moth species of one of the several suborders: Tortricoidea or Pyraloidea or Gelechioidea, which with other suborders of moths are loosely classed together as Heterocera.

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Location

Species information

  • Not Sensitive
  • Local Native
  • Non-Invasive

Sighting information

  • 2 Abundance
  • 23 Jan 2019 12:11 PM Recorded on
  • Alison Milton Recorded by
  • Website Reported via
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